Adobe ColdFusion survey for the next version

Adobe ColdFusion , Adobe ColdFusion 2016 , Announcements 4 Comments »

As you are probably aware, we are in the planning stage for the next version of ColdFusion. You may have already seen a blog post asking you to submit your wishlist for the next version.

This post is about a survey that will give Adobe valuable information about your usage of ColdFusion. Please take a few minutes to take this survey and provide your feedback. The data from the survey will be used to validate a set of hypothesis about the usage of ColdFusion. This will eventually help us build a great next version of ColdFusion, codenamed Aether.

Thank you for your valuable time. Here is the survey link again.

 

 

 

 

ColdFusion (2016 release) - Security audit report

Security , Adobe ColdFusion 2016 , Announcements 3 Comments »

As you are probably aware, with each version of ColdFusion, security is at the top of the priority list. With the latest release of ColdFusion, it is not just the security related features. Emphasis was laid on the inherent security of the ColdFusion platform by itself. To validate this, the PSIRT (Product Security Incident Response Team) at Adobe helped arrange a third party security audit for ColdFusion. The audit did come up with a few findings. Our Product engineers did an excellent job of mitigating all the findings to the fullest. 

To validate the above claim, we now have a public facing security report, from the agency that performed the security audit, indicating that 100% of all findings have been mitigated. Here is the public facing report with all the details. You can also view the link to this security audit report under datasheets and whitepapers section of the ColdFusion product home page on the Adobe website.

Reminder: $199 Super Early Bird Rate ends May 31st!

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Remember that the $199 Super Early Bird Rate for ColdFusion Summit 2016 ends on May 31st so there are only a few days left to get that discount.  

The preconference sessions are also filling up quickly, and have very limited capacity so if you were considering attending please sign up soon.

You can register here: https://cfsummit.adobeevents.com/register/

 

Don't forget that call for speakers ends tomorrow as well, so please submit any topic you would like to speak about by tomorrow here: http://cfsummit.speakerform.com

ColdFusion Summit 2016 will be held at Mandalay Bay Resort in Las Vegas, NV on October 10th and 11th.  

The preconference workshops on Security and API Development & Management will be on October 9th.

 

See you there!


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Submitting your wishlist for the next version of ColdFusion

Adobe ColdFusion 2016 , Announcements 7 Comments »

Here is a way to let us know your wishlist for the future versions of ColdFusion. The process is really simple.

 

1. Log into the public bug tracker https://bugbase.adobe.com

2. Click on Add Bug. 

3. Choose ColdFusion as the product and version as 2016. Remember, the version to be selected is 2016.

4. Select product area as wishlist and submit your list in the bug description.

 

That's it! We would love to hear your thoughts on what you would like to see as a part of upcoming versions.

 

 

Applying update on a ColdFusion instance running with a non-admin user

Adobe ColdFusion , Adobe ColdFusion 10 , Adobe ColdFusion 11 , ColdFusion , ColdFusion 11 5 Comments »

You may run into issues if you are using a non-administrator user account to install ColdFusion updates manually, or if an installation is attempted from the ColdFusion administrator console when ColdFusion service is running with a non-administrator account. In such cases, the update may not install successfully. and may complete with errors.

The Windows user account used by the ColdFusion service should have the privileges to start and stop the ColdFusion service. The updater needs to stop the ColdFusion service, so that it can replace the class files used by the service. After the update is installed, the updater starts up the ColdFusion service. Similarly if the updater packages any updates related to the other ColdFusion services, such as ColdFusion Add-On/Jetty service or ColdFusion .NET service or ColdFusion ODBC service, it would stop and start these services as well.

To avoid running into the issue above, one can take either of the following 2 approaches: 

 - Stop the ColdFusion service manually before running the updater jar. Restart the service, once the update is installed. This, of course, would need to be done every time you install an update; or

 - Assign the ColdFusion user account the privileges to start/stop the service. This would be a one-time fix.

If you are using Windows 2003 server, XP you can follow this blog post, to assign start/stop privileges to the ColdFusion service user account. But, if you are on a later edition of Windows such as Windows 7 or Windows 2012 server, you can keep on reading.

Windows Service Controller command can be used to set permissions on a Windows service. We will be using the following 2 variants of the command :

SDSHOW : To display the permissions on a service. 

syntax : sc [<ServerName>] sdshow <ServiceName> <ServiceSecurityDescriptor>

SDSET : To set the permissions on a service.

syntax : sc [<ServerName>] sdset <ServiceName> <ServiceSecurityDescriptor>

The security descriptors in the syntax above are represented by what is known as "Security Descriptor Definition Language" (SDDL). An SDDL descriptor has it's own syntax and formatting conventions which, at first, may seem a bit intimidating, and I might add, somewhat bland. But we will just dwell on the elementary details that are relevant to our purpose. If you want to get into the nuances of the Language you can check out the resources referenced at the end of this post.

Before modifying the permissions to a service , it would be a good idea to view the permissions first. To do that run the following command:

sc SDSHOW "ColdFusion 2016 Application Server"

You can find out the name of the service from the service properties in the Services window. The output should be something similar to the following :

D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;IU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)

I'll break down the output above into subsections and try to describe them.

D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;IU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)

The prefix D is for discretionary access control list (DACL) permissions. it identifies users or groups that are allowed or denied access to a secured object.

S:(AU;FA;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;WD)

The prefix S is for system access control list (SACL) which controls how access is audited. It enables administrators to log attempts to access a secured object in security event logs. This section is not pertinent to our interest, and hence will not be discussed further. 

Each segment enclosed by parentheses such as "(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)", is an ACE or "Access Control Entry". It describes the permissions to a specific user or group.

The first letter in the ACE specifies the ACE type. 'A' here denotes "Allow". Similarly a 'D' would denote "Deny".

The next set of letters ("CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC") denote the permissions. It is a combination of sets of 2 letters that specify the nature of permission. I'll list out the components below :

CC : SERVICE_QUERY_CONFIG – ask the SCM for the service’s current configuration

DC : Delete All Child Objects

LC : SERVICE_QUERY_STATUS

SW : SERVICE_ENUMERATE_DEPENDENTS

RP : Read all properites

WP : Stop the service

DT : SERVICE_PAUSE_CONTINUE

LO : SERVICE_INTERROGATE

CR : SERVICE_USER_DEFINED_CONTROL

SD : Delete

RC : READ_CONTROL – read the security descriptor on this service.

WD : Modify permissions

WO : Modify owner

 

The last code in ACE denotes the trustee. Some of the values it can take are:

SY : Local system

BU : Built-in users

IU : Interactively logged-on user

BA : Built-in administrators

If the intent is to modify the permission for a specific user and not a group, then you should rather use the SID associated with that user account. Suppose the ColdFusion Application service is running with a non-administrator account called "cfuser". To get the security identifier (SID) for "cfuser" account, you can execute the following WMIC command :

wmic useraccount where name='cfuser' get sid

That should output something similar to the following:

SID

S-1-5-21-464414946-3681088821-1826911322-1510

To enable start/stop permission for "cfuser" on ColdFusion Application service, you can use the output generated in the SDSHOW command and append an ACE element for "cfuser" with the desired permission set, as follows : 

SC SDSET "ColdFusion 2016 Application Server" D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;IU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)(A;;RPWPCR;;;S-1-5-21-464414946-3681088821-1826911322-1510)S:(AU;FA;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;WD)

And, of course, you should run the command with administrator privileges.

If you are using other ColdFusion services, such as ColdFusion Add-on Services, ColdFusion .NET Service, ODBC Agent and ODBC server, you can follow the same steps as above to change permissions to them.

 

References:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-in/library/windows/hardware/ff563667(v=vs.85).aspx

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/askds/2008/05/07/the-security-descriptor-definition-language-of-love-part-2/

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