ColdFusion 11 Update 10 and ColdFusion 10 Update 21 released

This post is to announce the release of updates for ColdFusion 11 and ColdFusion 10.
These updates address the security vulnerability CVE-2014-3529, mentioned in the bulletin APSB16-30.
ColdFusion 2016 is not affected by this vulnerability.
Refer the following KB articles for instructions on how to download and install the updates.
ColdFusion 11 Update 10
ColdFusion 10 Update 21

Applying update on a ColdFusion instance running with a non-admin user

You may run into issues if you are using a non-administrator user account to install ColdFusion updates manually, or if an installation is attempted from the ColdFusion administrator console when ColdFusion service is running with a non-administrator account. In such cases, the update may not install successfully. and may complete with errors.

The Windows user account used by the ColdFusion service should have the privileges to start and stop the ColdFusion service. The updater needs to stop the ColdFusion service, so that it can replace the class files used by the service. After the update is installed, the updater starts up the ColdFusion service. Similarly if the updater packages any updates related to the other ColdFusion services, such as ColdFusion Add-On/Jetty service or ColdFusion .NET service or ColdFusion ODBC service, it would stop and start these services as well.

To avoid running into the issue above, one can take either of the following 2 approaches: 

 – Stop the ColdFusion service manually before running the updater jar. Restart the service, once the update is installed. This, of course, would need to be done every time you install an update; or

 – Assign the ColdFusion user account the privileges to start/stop the service. This would be a one-time fix.

If you are using Windows 2003 server, XP you can follow this blog post, to assign start/stop privileges to the ColdFusion service user account. But, if you are on a later edition of Windows such as Windows 7 or Windows 2012 server, you can keep on reading.

Windows Service Controller command can be used to set permissions on a Windows service. We will be using the following 2 variants of the command :

SDSHOW : To display the permissions on a service. 

syntax : sc [<ServerName>] sdshow <ServiceName> <ServiceSecurityDescriptor>

SDSET : To set the permissions on a service.

syntax : sc [<ServerName>] sdset <ServiceName> <ServiceSecurityDescriptor>

The security descriptors in the syntax above are represented by what is known as "Security Descriptor Definition Language" (SDDL). An SDDL descriptor has it's own syntax and formatting conventions which, at first, may seem a bit intimidating, and I might add, somewhat bland. But we will just dwell on the elementary details that are relevant to our purpose. If you want to get into the nuances of the Language you can check out the resources referenced at the end of this post.

Before modifying the permissions to a service , it would be a good idea to view the permissions first. To do that run the following command:

sc SDSHOW "ColdFusion 2016 Application Server"

You can find out the name of the service from the service properties in the Services window. The output should be something similar to the following :

D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;IU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)

I'll break down the output above into subsections and try to describe them.

D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;IU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)

The prefix D is for discretionary access control list (DACL) permissions. it identifies users or groups that are allowed or denied access to a secured object.

S:(AU;FA;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;WD)

The prefix S is for system access control list (SACL) which controls how access is audited. It enables administrators to log attempts to access a secured object in security event logs. This section is not pertinent to our interest, and hence will not be discussed further. 

Each segment enclosed by parentheses such as "(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)", is an ACE or "Access Control Entry". It describes the permissions to a specific user or group.

The first letter in the ACE specifies the ACE type. 'A' here denotes "Allow". Similarly a 'D' would denote "Deny".

The next set of letters ("CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC") denote the permissions. It is a combination of sets of 2 letters that specify the nature of permission. I'll list out the components below :

CC : SERVICE_QUERY_CONFIG – ask the SCM for the service’s current configuration

DC : Delete All Child Objects

LC : SERVICE_QUERY_STATUS

SW : SERVICE_ENUMERATE_DEPENDENTS

RP : Read all properites

WP : Stop the service

DT : SERVICE_PAUSE_CONTINUE

LO : SERVICE_INTERROGATE

CR : SERVICE_USER_DEFINED_CONTROL

SD : Delete

RC : READ_CONTROL – read the security descriptor on this service.

WD : Modify permissions

WO : Modify owner

 

The last code in ACE denotes the trustee. Some of the values it can take are:

SY : Local system

BU : Built-in users

IU : Interactively logged-on user

BA : Built-in administrators

If the intent is to modify the permission for a specific user and not a group, then you should rather use the SID associated with that user account. Suppose the ColdFusion Application service is running with a non-administrator account called "cfuser". To get the security identifier (SID) for "cfuser" account, you can execute the following WMIC command :

wmic useraccount where name='cfuser' get sid

That should output something similar to the following:

SID

S-1-5-21-464414946-3681088821-1826911322-1510

To enable start/stop permission for "cfuser" on ColdFusion Application service, you can use the output generated in the SDSHOW command and append an ACE element for "cfuser" with the desired permission set, as follows : 

SC SDSET "ColdFusion 2016 Application Server" D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;IU)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;SU)(A;;RPWPCR;;;S-1-5-21-464414946-3681088821-1826911322-1510)S:(AU;FA;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;WD)

And, of course, you should run the command with administrator privileges.

If you are using other ColdFusion services, such as ColdFusion Add-on Services, ColdFusion .NET Service, ODBC Agent and ODBC server, you can follow the same steps as above to change permissions to them.

 

References:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-in/library/windows/hardware/ff563667(v=vs.85).aspx

The Security Descriptor Definition Language of Love (Part 2)

ColdFusion Builder 2016 Update 1 released

This update is a companion update to ColdFusion 2016 Update 1 and primarily addresses issues related to Security Code Analyzer and it’s performance.

The issues fixed for this release are listed in this document

This update is applicable for a standalone as well as a plugin installation of ColdFusion Builder. After applying this update, ColdFusion Builder build number should be 298831.

ColdFusion Builder has an automatic update notification that notifies the user of the updates availability.

Updates for ColdFusion 2016, ColdFusion 11 and ColdFusion 10 released

This post is to announce the release of updates for ColdFusion 2016, ColdFusion 11 and ColdFusion 10.

These updates address a common vulnerability mentioned in security bulletin APSB 16-16, upgrade the Tomcat engine and contain other bug fixes. 

ColdFusion 2016 Update 1

ColdFusion (2016 release) Update 1 addresses an issue mentioned in the security bulletin APSB 16-16. Tomcat has been upgraded to version 8.0.32. This update includes several important bug fixes for security, core language features, server, and other areas.

For details, refer this technote.

ColdFusion 11 Update 8

ColdFusion 11 Update 8 addresses an issue mentioned in the security bulletin APSB 16-16. Tomcat has been upgraded to version 7.0.68. This update includes several important bug fixes for security, language, AJAX, and other features.

For details, refer this technote,  

ColdFusion 10 Update 19

ColdFusion 10 Update 19 addresses an issue mentioned in the security bulletin APSB 16-16. Tomcat has been upgraded to version 7.0.68. This update includes important bug fixes for security and server

For details, refer this technote

ColdFusion 11 Update 6 and ColdFusion 10 Update 17 now available

The following ColdFusion updates are now available for download. These updates address a common XXE vulnerability in BlazeDS. For details refer the security bulletin hyperlinks in the sections below.

Users who are using LCDS with ColdFusion, should refer this technote, for updating their LCDS installation.

ColdFusion 11 Update 6

This Update addresses a vulnerability mentioned in the security bulletin APSB15-21. This update is cumulative and includes fixes from previous ColdFusion 11 updates.

For details, refer this technote.

ColdFusion 10 Update 17

This Update addresses a vulnerability mentioned in the security bulletin APSB15-21. This update is cumulative and includes fixes from previous ColdFusion 10 updates. 

For details, refer this technote.

getHeaders – a new attribute in the cfexchangemail tag

With ColdFusion 11 Update 3, we have introduced a new parameter called “getHeaders”, in the “cfExchangeMail” tag. It accepts a boolean value. When set to true, cfExchangeMail returns a query with an additional “InternetHeader” column. This column contains a struct containing key-value pairs of the email-headers associated with each message.

Email message headers provide technical details about the message, such as who sent it, the software used to compose it, the version of the MIME protocol used by the sender etc. 

On Exchange 2010, the fields that are returned are: CC, Content-Transfer-Encoding, Content-Type, Date, From, MIME-Version, Message-ID, Received, Return-Path, Subject, To, X-MS-Exchange-Organization-AuthAs, X-MS-Exchange-Organization-AuthSource, X-Mailer.

You may reference this weblink for the detailed list of the fields and their description.

You can put this new feature to any good use that suites your purpose. I will dwell on one such use case below.

In MS Exchange 2010 and later, the “ToId” column in the retrieved messages query contains the primary email address of the sender. A primary email address can have multiple aliases. If you need to retrieve the email-alias the message was sent to, you can make use of this new attribute.

Here’s an example that demonstrates the usage the tag in the context of the use case discussed above:

<cfmail from=”#frm_usr_email#” to=”#to_usr_alias#” cc=”#cc_usr_alias#” subject=”#msg_sub#”  server= “#exchangeServerIP#” port = “25”>

———– testing mail to an alias address ————

</cfmail>

<cfset sleep(5000)>

<cfexchangeConnection action=”open” username =”#to_usr#” password=”#password#” server=”#exchangeServerIP#” serverversion=”#version#” protocol=”#protocol#” connection=”excon”>

<cfexchangemail action=”get” name=”usr_msgs” connection=”excon” getheaders=true folder=”Inbox”>

<cfexchangefilter name=”fromID” value=’#frm_usr#’>

<cfexchangefilter name=”subject” value=”#msg_sub#”>

</cfexchangemail>

<cfif usr_msgs.recordcount GTE 1>

info from cfexchangemail fields:<br>

<cfloop query=”usr_msgs”>

<cfoutput>

#usr_msgs.subject#<br> 

#usr_msgs.CC#<br> 

#usr_msgs.fromId#<br>

</cfoutput>

</cfloop>

info from cfexchangemail.internetHeaders fields:<br>

<cfloop query=”usr_msgs”>

<cfoutput>

#ReplaceList(usr_msgs.internetHeaders[“from”][1], “>,<“, “,”, “,”, “,”)#<br>

#ReplaceList(usr_msgs.internetHeaders[“to”][1], “>,<“, “,”, “,”, “,”)#<br>

#ReplaceList(usr_msgs.internetHeaders[“cc”][1], “>,<“, “,”, “,”, “,”)#<br>

</cfoutput>

</cfloop>

</cfif>

 

You can reference the bugbase, for the enhancement request originally logged for this feature.

ColdFusion 11 Update 5 and ColdFusion 10 Update 16 released

The following ColdFusion updates are now available for download:

ColdFusion 11 Update 5

This Update includes approximately 115 bug fixes related to Language, Mobile Support, File Management, Document Management, Administrator, Connector and several other areas.

It also addresses a vulnerability mentioned in the security bulletin APSB 15-07 and support for Apache 2.4.10. With this update the Web Server Config tool now backs up all the connector configurations files.

For the details refer this technote.

ColdFusion 10 Update 16

ColdFusion 10 Update 16 includes approximately 35 bug fixes related to File Management, ORM, Language, Document Management and certain other areas. It also addresses a vulnerability mentioned in the security bulletin APSB15-07.

For the details refer this technote.

ColdFusion 10 Update 16 prerelease build refreshed

Update: Since this post was made, the final version of Update 16 was released and should be used instead.

The ColdFusion 10 Update 16 prerelease build has been refreshed.

For changes please refer this document.

For instructions on how to install this update you can refer this blog post announcing the Update pre-release.

We look forward to your feedback and suggestions.

NB. Users who had applied ColdFusion 10 Update 16 pre-release build earlier, should uninstall and re-apply this update build. The build number after applying this update should be 10,0,16,293399 (PreRelease).

ColdFusion 11 Update 5 prerelease build refreshed

Update: Since this post was made, the final version of Update 5 was released and should be used instead.

The ColdFusion 11 Update 5 prerelease build has been refreshed.

For changes please refer this document.

For instructions on how to install this update you can refer the following blog post announcing the Update 5 pre-release: http://blogs.coldfusion.com/coldfusion-11-update-5-prerelease-build-now-available

We continue to look forward to your feedback and suggestions.

NB. Users who had applied ColdFusion 11 Update 5 pre-release build earlier, should uninstall and re-apply this update build. The build number after applying this update should be 11,0,05,293370 (PreRelease).

ColdFusion 10 Update 16 prerelease build available

Update: Since this post was made, the final version of Update 16 was released and should be used instead.

ColdFusion 10 Update 16 early access build is now available for your testing and feedback. Please note that this is a test build and should not be used in a production environment.

Refer this document for the list of bugs fixed in this update.

Follow the steps below to apply this update.

  1. Navigate to ColdFusion Administrator -> Server Updates -> Updates.
  2. Under Settings tab, check “Automatically Check for Updates” check box
  3. Change the Site URL to https://cfdownload.adobe.com/pub/adobe/coldfusion/PR/updates.xml. 
  4. Click Submit to save your changes.
  5. Under the “Available Updates” tab, click on the “Check for Updates” button.
  6. “ColdFusion 10 Update 16” should be listed under the “Available updates” tab. 
  7. Click on the “Download and Install” button to install the update.
To apply this update manually, click on this link to download the update jar. To run the downloaded jar, execute the following command:
java -jar <jar-file-dir>/hotfix_016.jar
You should use the JRE used by CF for running the update jar (for standlaone CF, it should be <cf_root>/jre/bin)
For further details on the manual application of the updater follow this help article.
The build number after applying this update should be 10,0,16,293351(PreRelease).

In case, you have configured local site for receiving the update notifications, then please take back up of the URL before changing it to the prerelease URL.

We will look forward to your valuable feedback and suggestions.